Posts tagged ‘Twitter’

Nonprofit social networks: Is quantity trumping quality?

I recently completed an exhaustive clearing out of Facebook “friends,” and I have to admit, it was pretty refreshing. Refreshing like cleaning out an old pile of mail that includes expired coupons, already-paid bills and never-to-be-opened direct mail letters (don’t mention that to the rest of the development department at my non-profit). Refreshing like getting rid of piles of never-to-be-worn clothes. Refreshing like … getting rid of old clutter.

I have nothing against many of the people I defriended. Many were pretty nice individuals when they became my Facebook friends, and likely still are. But I realized over the past week that even though my friend total was pretty healthy, the value of my network wasn’t that great. As fun as it is to peek in on old dorm acquaintances and random classmates from high school, I realized I didn’t really want them in my network. I wanted my network to include people I actually corresponded with, people I wanted to follow because I was truly interested in their updates, people who added value to my network. (more…)

July 1, 2009 at 5:33 pm Leave a comment

Social media quote of the day

“The qualities that make Twitter seem inane and half-baked are what make it so powerful.” – Jonathan Zittrain, Harvard Law School professor

Taken from a New York Times piece on the power of social media in the Iran elections.

June 16, 2009 at 1:49 pm Leave a comment

Lobbying social-media style with Twitter: Examples and how-to’s

It’s been about a year since I’ve created a Twitter feed for my organization, Public Citizen.

During this time, we’ve posted links, conversed with followers, shared content related to our mission, and encouraged followers to take action. And overall, Twitter has helped us build Public Citizen’s brand, develop a younger following and seem more approachable. But one thing we haven’t tried is using Twitter to achieve what used to be a solely offline activity: Public interest lobbying.

Contacting lawmakers has become increasingly difficult. Their inboxes typically block large influxes of constituent emails (an example of this occurred news of the financial bailout first hit the news this fall), and constituents typically can only email lawmakers within their district. I’ve talked to some activists who have recommended going back to hand-delivering paper petitions to get the word out. There’s even a campaign from Consumers Union called Don’tBlockMyVoice.org.

Now, with the expanding world of social media, lawmakers are creating Twitter accounts. Granted, the person actually doing the tweeting probably isn’t the lawmaker, but this does provide another avenue, on top of paper, phone calls and emails, to communicate with elected officials. (more…)

April 8, 2009 at 9:28 pm Leave a comment


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